"While I love my body, my words feel like a much more personal reflection of who I am. And a hostile comment posted on something I’ve written has never actually upset me. So why should this be any different?"


Nudity has never been an uncomfortable thing for me. Ever since I was a child, I’ve always been delighted and perplexed by my body. I’ve loved watching it change over the years. I’ve loved charting the appearance of new scars, new markings, new sensations. And I’ve loved everything that it’s allowed me to do. 


For me, and I’m sure for most, the real challenge of the project was putting that body online. It’s not that I worry about others seeing it. I’ve never been particulary bashful, and late night summer skinny dipping excursions are really one of the best things about being alive. It’s the internet’s permanence that threw me. The idea that my image could be found years later, devoid of context. I was worried about some hypothetical future coworker commenting on the picture, or some old acquaintance finding it and judging me (for what, I’m not actually sure). Which of course is a totally ridiculous fear. I’m a journalist and a freelance writer, and so I live most of my life on the internet. Everytime I post an article, an opinion, a tweet, I put myself online for public consumption. And I rarely consider the implications that accompany that. While I love my body, my words feel like a much more personal reflection of who I am. And a hostile comment posted on something I’ve written has never actually upset me. So why should this be any different? 


I’ve done life modelling in the past, and I find it such a powerful, emotional experience. I’m constrained to often uncomfortable poses for long periods of time, and I’m trapped there with only my own thoughts. But after a few awkward minutes, I begin to feel centred. The harmony between mind and body becomes profoundly apparent, and time passes in a funny way. 


My shoot with Jos wasn’t really like that. We had a great conversation about our work, our travel plans, and bands we liked, while I played some music and typed up an interview. Then she had to leave, and I put my top back on. It was a simple and beautiful afternoon.

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